self-care

Issues with you beauty products

Avoid:Redlist-eye-face

We all know that makeup isn’t really great for you, but we’ll justify it. But did you know how bad it actually is? Because I really didn’t. I’ve been making those makeup videos on Instagram and really enjoying it, but it occurred to me to look into what I was publicly supporting. I’m truly baffled by what we blindly put into our bodies. Most of the following is directly off of Safe Cosmetics – but everything that I’ve included I also backed up on my own through tons of research from various credible sites.

The following health concerns from the following chemicals range from cancer, anxiety, depression, neural toxicity, weight gain, endocrine toxicity, and so much more. I encourage you to do some of your own research and be sure that you know what you’re using.

 

1,4-DIOXANE
Not listed on ingredient labels, 1,4-dioxane is a contaminant linked to cancer found in products that create suds, such as shampoo and liquid soap.

BENZOPHENONE & RELATED COMPOUNDS
A chemical linked to cancer, benzophenone is used in cosmetics such as lip balm and nail polish to protect the products from UV light.

BUTYLATED COMPOUNDS
Concerns about organ-system toxicity and endocrine disruption led the European Union to prohibit the preservative butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) from cosmetics.

CARBON BLACK

Carbon black is a dark black powder used as a pigment in cosmetics such as eyeliner, mascara and lipstick that has been linked to increased incidence of cancer.

CARCINOGENS IN COSMETICS

The laws governing cosmetics and personal care products are so limited that known cancer-causing chemicals are legally allowed in personal care products.

COAL TAR

Coal tar is a known carcinogen found in shampoos, soaps, hair dyes, and lotions. Studies show that it can lead to skin tumors as well as organ toxicity.

ETHANOLAMINE COMPOUNDS (MEA, DEA, TEA AND OTHERS)

Diethanolamine (DEA) is a type of ethanolamines, chemicals widely used in cosmetics. The European Union prohibits DEA in cosmetics due to concerns about formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines.

FRAGRANCE

Many products list “fragrance” on the label, but very few name the specific ingredients that make up a “fragrance.” The International Fragrance Association (IFRA) lists 3,059 materials that are reported as being used in fragrance compounds. Of these 3,059 ingredients, some have evidence linking them to health effects including cancer, reproductive toxicity, allergies and sensitivities.

HOMOSALATE

Homosalate is a widely used chemical in sunscreens and skin care products with SPF. Homosalate is a potential endocrine disruptor.

HYDROQUINONE

One of the most toxic ingredients used in personal care products, hydroquinone is primarily associated with use in skin lighteners marketed to women of color. Health concerns include, but are not limited to, cancer, organ toxicity, and respiratory tract irritation.

LEAD AND OTHER HEAVY METALS

Heavy metals like lead, arsenic, mercury, are contaminants found in a wide variety of personal care products including lipstick, whitening toothpaste, eyeliner and nail color. Health concerns include, but are not limited to, cancer, developmental and reproductive toxicity, organ system toxicity, environmental concerns, bioaccumulation, delay in puberty in adolescents, neurotoxicity.

METHYLISOTHIAZOLINONE AND METHYLCHLOROISOTHIAZOLINONE

They may be hard to pronounce, but they can be even harder on the body. Health concerns, including but not limited to, weight gain, allergies, and even death.

 

Mica is found in many face makeups and eyeshadows.

NITROSAMINES

Nitrosamines are impurities linked to cancer that can show up in a wide array of cosmetics ingredients—including diethanolamine (DEA) and triethanolamine (TEA)—and products.

OCTINOXATE

An endocrine disruptor that mimics estrogen, octinoxate is found in hair color products and shampoos, sunscreen, lipstick, nail polish, skin creams.

PETROLATUM, PETROLEUM JELLY

Petrolatum, or petroleum jelly, derived from petroleum, is cancer causing and often used in personal care products as a moisturizing agent.

PHENOXYETHANOL

Phenoxyethanol is used as a preservative in cosmetic products and also as a stabilizer in perfumes and soaps. It can affect the nervous system, especially in infants/ babies, and is cancer causing.

POLYACRYLAMIDE

Found in facial moisturizers, anti-aging products and more, polyacrylamide can break down into known carcinogen acrylamide.

POLYTETRAFLUOROETHYLENE (PTFE, AKA TEFLON®)

Teflon® in your makeup? Yuck.

PARABENS

Parabens are preservatives used in a wide variety of personal care products. These endocrine-disrupting chemicals can be absorbed through skin, blood and the digestive system.

PHTHALATES

Banned from cosmetics in the European Union, phthalates are widely used in color cosmetics, fragranced lotions, body washes and other products sold in the United States. Phthalates can lead to developmental and reproductive issues. Read more.

SYNTHETIC MUSKS

Synthetic musks are chemicals added as scents to personal care products, including perfumes, lotions, and many cosmetics. They can affect your endocrine system as well as your reproductive organs.

TALC

Some talc may contain the known carcinogen asbestos, therefore it should be avoided in powders and other personal care products. In 2014 Deane Berg won a lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson for their talc-filled baby powder that was proven to have caused her Stage 3 Ovarian Cancer. Johnson & Johnson was ordered by the jury to pay out $72 million in damages. Read about the lawsuit here. 

I’ve found that talc is the first and main ingredient in most Urban Decay eyeshadows, including in the Naked palettes.

TITANIUM DIOXIDE
In its inhalable form, as it is in loose powders, titanium dioxide is considered a possible carcinogen.

TRICLOSAN

Triclosan, which has been linked to hormone disruption and antibiotic resistance, can be found in soaps, detergents, toothpastes, deodorants, and more.
This isn’t to scare anyone but the attention to it is so important. A vlog on this is coming sometime around the first of the week –
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